Arts & Culture

Is the United States haunted by its racist past? 🔊

Is the United States haunted by its racist past? 🔊

In recent weeks, the news in the United States has been filled with stories of statues and public spaces being altered or removed. These stories are usually connected with America’s racist past, with a particular eye towards the issue of slavery.

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Should racially offensive public memorials be removed? 🔊

Should racially offensive public memorials be removed? 🔊

In the days after the killing of George Floyd, protesters have made several demands to counter police violence and racism in the United States. Some of the demands directly relate to the history of race and violence in America and in particular an emphasis on the memory of the American Civil War. 

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What is decolonisation?

What is decolonisation?

Many writers only loosely define what they mean by it, and others use it as a general black box for addressing the negative impacts of colonisation upon Indigenous peoples.  

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First in Family: Our University Voyages

First in Family: Our University Voyages

Awarding-winning filmmaker Professor Annie Goldson didn’t have to travel too far from her University of Auckland desk for her latest documentary production, with Dr ‘Ema Wolfgramm-Foliaki.

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Why do people steal art? 🔊

Why do people steal art? 🔊

The recent heist at the Green Vault within the Dresden Castle in Germany has been speculated to be one of the largest art heists in history.

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Why do we need journalism?

Why do we need journalism?

Journalism is facing a profound financial crisis. Around the world, news outlets are closing, and journalists are losing their jobs. Should we be worried?

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Q+A: Why is the United States so polarised?

Q+A: Why is the United States so polarised?

What are the fault lines that have fractured politics in America? Julian Zelizer has analysed the historical roots of the present-day political turmoil, divisions, and partisanship in the US for his new book Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974. 

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What is the ‘Alt-Right’?

What is the ‘Alt-Right’?

After the horrendous attacks in Christchurch, many people understandably have questions about the motives and ideology of the alleged attacker. Damon Berry analyses the role the alt-right might have played in the attacks.

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How does culture affect mental health? 🔊

How does culture affect mental health? 🔊

How does culture shape our understanding and treatment of mental illness? Maria Armoudian speaks with Roberto Lewis-Fernandez, Tanya Marie Luhrmann, and Andrew G. Ryder about culture and its impact on mental health.

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Broken survivors: With them through hell

Broken survivors: With them through hell

The thousands of New Zealand men who fought in the First World War went through hell. And right beside them was another fighting force. Anna Rogers explores the story of New Zealand’s medical services in WWI.

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Is protecting heritage a human right?

Is protecting heritage a human right?

Is protecting heritage a human right? George Nicholas looks into the responsibilities and concerns about the political, ethical and social dimensions of archaeological research and heritage management.

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Why should we learn Te Reo Māori?

Why should we learn Te Reo Māori?

Stephen May outlines why it is important New Zealanders should learn Te Reo Māori in the wake of debate around whether the language should be made compulsory in schools.

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Is Netflix killing the cinema?

Is Netflix killing the cinema?

The rise in popularity of on-demand video streaming services like Netflix is increasingly seen as a threat to the 113-year-old ritual of going to a cinema to see a movie.

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Conspiracy Clash: What’s behind it?

Conspiracy Clash: What’s behind it?

Flat Earthism and the idea that human activity is not responsible for climate change are two of the most prevalent conspiracy theories today. Both have been increasing in popularity since the late 20th century but what is behind this conspiracy clash?

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What is context?  ▶

What is context? ▶

Associate Professor Mark Amsler from the School of Cultures, Languages and Linguistics at the University of Auckland talks about his big question, “What is context?”

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Q+A: Are we living in an age of excess?

Q+A: Are we living in an age of excess?

Driven by a maddening quest for perfection, technology, deregulation, and a superficial and often inaccurate mass media, America’s national psychology has become increasingly narcissistic. Maria Armoudin discusses whether we are living in an age of excess with Jay Slosar. 

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Who really was Martin Luther King Jr? 🔊

Who really was Martin Luther King Jr? 🔊

While much of the world remembers Martin Luther King, Jr. as primarily a leader of civil rights and a great orator, others say he stood for so much more. is death. Maria Armoudian discusses the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with David Garrow, Joshua Inwood, and Thomas Jackson.

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Does New Zealand’s history matter?

Does New Zealand’s history matter?

New Zealand historian Felicity Barnes takes exception to the idea that New Zealand’s past is somehow “too small, too parochial” to compete with bigger, global stories.

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Q+A: History as battleground: How does memory shape today’s politics?

Q+A: History as battleground: How does memory shape today’s politics?

Historical memory is a battlefield where competing narratives seek to become the official ones, and then they affect the politics and policies of the future. Several scholars have begun to study what they call memory entrepreneurs and how those entrepreneurs use historical memory to forward their political agendas.

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Q+A: Is Google dangerous?

Q+A: Is Google dangerous?

How has internet titan Google changed our knowledge, our politics, and our lives over the last two decades? Siva Vaidhyanathan argues that Google affects the information we gather, jeopardises our personal privacy, and hinders public projects.

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Has Black History Month had its intended impact? 🔊

Has Black History Month had its intended impact? 🔊

As Black History Month ends for another year, has it had its intended impact? Maria Armoudian explores this question and revisits the 1920 founding of Black History Month and the pivotal civil rights campaign in Birmingham with V.P. Franklin.

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How has Hollywood influenced American politics? 🔊

How has Hollywood influenced American politics? 🔊

In 1918 the leaders of the FBI expressed deep concern about the power of movie stars to affect politics. As a result, they began a surveillance program to watch over those they thought might be radicals. Since then it has long seemed the Hollywood crowd was ideologically left, however, Steven Ross says that is actually not true.

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Is graffiti art?

Is graffiti art?

Criminology lecturer Ron Kramer speaks to Julianne Evans about graffiti art and his unconventional weekend side-line in commissioned graffiti, writing under a pseudonym.

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What is greenwashing culture? 🔊

What is greenwashing culture? 🔊

What is Greenwashing Culture? In his new book, Toby Miller argues that culture has become an enabler of environmental criminals to win over local, national, and international communities.

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How is art used to counter oppression? 🔊

How is art used to counter oppression? 🔊

Throughout history, art has been used as an act of resistance and as a weapon to counter oppression and violence. Maria Armoudian talks to professor Mark LeVine about the role of art in resistance movements.

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Abusing power? The cartoonist in a post-truth world  ▶

Abusing power? The cartoonist in a post-truth world ▶

Does visually ripping the piss out of politicians actually help them, or is it one of the very few effective ways of getting to the truth of what they are really about? This is one cartoonist’s experience of a weird yet wonderful profession.

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