Arts & Culture

Q+A: Fight the power: exploring the connections between music and politics

Music and politics have always had a strong relationship going back to the days of the Civil Rights Movement, the anti-war movement, and campaigns to combat racism. These days, artists such as Childish Gambino are pushing the boundaries visually and musically when it comes to using their art as a political vehicle. Sam Smith spoke with Patrycja Rozbicka about the intersection between music and politics.

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Why should we learn Te Reo Māori?

Stephen May outlines why it is important New Zealanders should learn Te Reo Māori in the wake of debate around whether the language should be made compulsory in schools.

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Is Netflix killing the cinema?

The rise in popularity of on-demand video streaming services like Netflix is increasingly seen as a threat to the 113-year-old ritual of going to a cinema to see a movie. James Robins spoke to Dr Karina Aveyard, author of “Lure of the Big Screen: Cinema in Rural Australia and the United Kingdom” about whether Netflix might kill the cinema.

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Conspiracy Clash: What’s behind it?

Flat Earthism and the idea that human activity is not responsible for climate change are two of the most prevalent conspiracy theories today. Both have been increasing in popularity since the late 20th century but what is behind this conspiracy clash?

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What is context? ▶

Associate Professor Mark Amsler from the School of Cultures, Languages and Linguistics at the University of Auckland talks about his big question, “What is context?”

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Q+A: Are we living in an age of excess?

Driven by a maddening quest for perfection, technology, deregulation, and a superficial, and often inaccurate mass media, America’s national psychology has become increasingly narcissistic. Maria Armoudin discusses whether we are living in an age of excess with Jay Slosar. 

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Who really was Martin Luther King Jr? 🔊

While much of the world remembers Martin Luther King, Jr. as primarily a leader of civil rights and a great orator, others say he stood for so much more. is death. Maria Armoudian discusses the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. with David Garrow, Joshua Inwood, and Thomas Jackson.

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Does New Zealand’s history matter?

New Zealand historian Felicity Barnes takes exception to the idea that New Zealand’s past is somehow “too small, too parochial” to compete with bigger, global stories.

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Q+A: History as battleground: How does memory shape today’s politics?

Historical memory is a battlefield where competing narratives seek to become the official ones, and then they affect the politics and policies of the future. Several scholars have begun to study what they call memory entrepreneurs and how those entrepreneurs use historical memory to forward their political agendas.

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Q+A: Is Google dangerous?

How has internet titan Google changed our knowledge, our politics, and our lives over the last two decades? Siva Vaidhyanathan argues that Google affects the information we gather, jeopardises our personal privacy, and hinders public projects.

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Has Black History Month had its intended impact? 🔊

As Black History Month ends for another year, has it had its intended impact? Maria Armoudian explores this question and revisits the 1920 founding of Black History Month and the pivotal civil rights campaign in Birmingham with V.P. Franklin.

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